Food Is Not Your Enemy


How Your Diet Can Heal You–Or Harm You

There’s a pill for everything. Pills to treat symptoms, pills to help prevent diseases, pills to deal with mental health issues. Sometimes these pills are very necessary, and can truly save lives. But there are times when food can work as well as medicine—if not better—when it comes to addressing specific health concerns.

Here are just a few examples:

-Just recently a study found that we can reduce the risk of dementia significantly just by changing our diet—eating in a way to lower blood pressure and weight make a big difference here.

-Many people can avoid taking drugs to lower their cholesterol—which can cause such side effects as headaches, muscle pain, and increased risk of diabetes—by switching up their diets. Eating more nuts, seeds, fiber-rich foods, olive oil, and fish and sidelining such foods as white/refined carbs and sugar can make a huge difference in our cholesterol numbers.

-Increasing intake of healthy fats from plants and fish and reducing the toxic combination of sugar and too much caffeine can really help people who are suffering from depression and/or anxiety.

-Blood pressure can respond quickly to changes in salt intake. Before committing to a lifetime of taking blood pressure meds, which also can have unwanted side effects, try significantly reducing your salt intake by eating less restaurant food and processed food like chips/pretzels, cold cuts, and canned soups.

-Rather than taking acid-reducing pills (which inhibit absorption of B vitamins) or downing Tums like candy, notice if there are particular foods that are causing your reflux or stomach upset. From experience working with my clients, I’ve found that this is true virtually 100 percent of the time.

You really can think of every bite of food you’re eating as something that is either going to lead to greater health, or something that could harm your health. So choose wisely, and make food your medicine rather than your poison.

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How to Slow Aging

When most of us think about the process of aging, we look at the external—our skin, our hair, our belly pouch that may have appeared in the past year. Our first response to seeing these changes may be to slather on an expensive cream, or dye our grays away, or go on a fad diet to whittle down our thickened waist. But one of the most effective ways to truly slow down our body’s aging process is to think differently about the foods we eat over the long term.

Some recent studies have found that structures in the body called telomeres play a large role in our longevity. Telomeres protect our DNA by capping the ends of our chromosomes and preventing them from becoming damaged. And it turns out that people with longer telomeres live longer than people with short telomeres.

The most effective way to ensure that you have long telomeres is to consume plenty of carotenoid-rich foods. Carotenoids are the natural pigments that are responsible for the bright colors of fruits and vegetables. Plant-based foods are also rich in antioxidants, which can help fight the oxidative stress that can lead to the shortening of our telomeres.

It’s also important to eat an anti-inflammatory diet to help prevent signs of aging. This means avoiding added sugars as well as refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice as much as you can. When it comes to preventing inflammation in the body, vegetables and fruits are again your friend here, along with healthy fats like olive oil, avocados, nuts, seeds, and fish. Healthy fats also help regulate our hormonal systems, an important factor when it comes to aging as well.

And as for applying cream to our skin? I do recommend using a moisturizer that contains sunscreen daily on the face, 365 days a year. The sun does play a large role in aging our skin.

The nice thing about eating to prevent aging is that the foods I’m recommending will also help you manage your weight and reduce your risk of heart disease, stroke, cancer, and diabetes. So eat colorfully, don’t fear fats, and nourish those telomeres!



Balance Is a Waste of Time
June 20, 2017, 3:50 pm
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle | Tags: , ,

Work-life balance was a mistake from the start. Because we don’t really want balance. We want satisfaction.” – Matthew Kelly, author

Balance is a sticky subject among many people. We have careers, partners, children, family commitments, classes, hobbies … plus big desires to improve our health. How can one possibly balance so many things?

I’m going to let you in on a little secret: You can’t.

“Harmony” is an easier goal than balance.

Harmony means everything is co-existing in a spirit of cooperation. But whatever you want to call it–harmony, balance, or “fitting it all in”–there is a secret to doing more of what you want and less of what you don’t want.

Although the solution sounds simple, it requires that you get absolutely clear on what you want your life to look like, and what you do not want in your life:

  • First, ask yourself what isn’t serving you. What doesn’t need to be in your life? What is dragging you down? Keeping you awake at night?
  • Have you identified a few things? Now get rid of them (or fix them–now).
  • Next, ask yourself what you want in your life, or in this week or this day. What do you want to accomplish? Who do you want to be with? Focus your energy on these things. If anything doesn’t fit into this larger scheme, let it go (or learn how to say “no”).

Ready to dive in and make a few changes? Give these tips a try and see how much more harmonious your life can be. No balance required.



How Much Water Should You Drink?
May 24, 2017, 3:53 pm
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle, Water, weight loss | Tags: ,

“How much water should I be drinking each day?” I get this question a lot.

The answer? It depends.

First off, it’s important to note that most people do not drink enough water. The consequences of mild to moderate dehydration can range from headaches, poor digestion, cravings, and sluggish thinking to skin breakouts, bad breath, and general fatigue. Water is necessary to keep every system in the body functioning properly, and plays a role in carrying nutrients and oxygen to our cells, preventing constipation, cushioning our joints, keeping our heartbeat stable, regulating body temperature and blood pressure, and more.

According to the Harvard Health Letter, most people need about four to six cups of water each day. But I think most of us would benefit from more than that, and over the years I’ve seen people feel better and reduce cravings from drinking more water. I actually prefer the almost clichéd advice of six to eight cups a day. In the warmer months, when we tend to play hard, sweat, and spend prolonged time in the sun, drinking even more water that that might be necessary. And of course, if you’re working out you’ll need a greater quantity of water as well.

To start your day off on the right foot, drink a glass of water as soon as you wake up. Drinking water first thing in the morning pulls out toxins from the previous day and freshens your system for the day ahead. Keep a bottle or cup of water accessible throughout the day, whether you are on the go or at a desk. Having water close by will remind you to take a sip when thirsty. The first sip will usually let you know how much more water you need. A sip or two may be enough, or you may need a big glass. If you drink most of your daily water before early evening, you most likely will not be thirsty before bed. This is good, because drinking before bed and then waking to use the bathroom disturbs your peaceful night’s sleep.

If the taste of plain water is unappealing, experiment to see how you can make it tasty and drinkable. Try adding a few mint leaves, a wedge of lemon, a sprig of parsley, slices of cucumber, a twist of lime, or a squeeze of orange to make water more tempting. Herbal tea counts as water intake too! Whichever way you prefer it, make water an important priority each day.



Avoiding the One-Size-Fits-All Diet
May 1, 2017, 10:49 am
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle, weight loss | Tags: , ,

I give advice for a living. How to eat well, how to achieve greater balance, and how to sustain it all, through stressful times and holidays and work travel and family meals and whatever life throws your way. There are some bedrock principles about healthy eating and living that I believe will help everyone—eating more home-cooked whole foods, for instance, or creating a specific plan for when and where you will exercise—but in the end, every person is different, and we all respond differently to certain recommendations.

If you’ve ever visited my Web site, you may have noticed that there’s a concept mentioned there known as “bio-individuality.” Simply stated, bio-individuality is the understanding that each of us has unique food and lifestyle needs. One person’s food is another person’s poison, and that’s why fad diets tend to fail in the long run. There really is no one way to eat that works for all of us. One person may thrive on the Paleo diet, while another may feel weighed down and moody from eating that way. One may lose weight from eating a low-fat diet, while many others might be ravenous with so little fat and end up binge-eating as a result.

So I give my advice knowing that any particular recommendation, even if it has a basis in science and has worked for others, might not be the ultimate answer for the person I’m counseling at the moment. We try and we see how it goes. If it works, that’s great. If not, we recalibrate and try something else. Similarly, if you read something in my newsletter and it doesn’t resonate for you, that’s fine! I offered a tip in last month’s newsletter about how eating a larger lunch may help in one’s weight-loss efforts, according to a scientific study. I’ve seen this work for many of my clients over the years, but one of my current clients tried it and found that a large lunch just made her feel sluggish. So we went in another direction.

The same approach would likely work well in your own life. Avoid wedding yourself to one way of doing things. Don’t assume you must make yourself wake at 5 a.m. to go jogging in order to lose weight. Don’t force yourself to eat kale if you don’t like it. Don’t insist on sticking with a particular diet that helped your friend if you’re seeing no change in your own body. Be flexible. See what works. And acknowledge what your body needs.



Is It Safe to Use a Microwave?
March 23, 2017, 10:06 am
Filed under: Chronic Disease, Healthy Lifestyle | Tags: ,

Microwave ovens have been in widespread use since the 1980s, and today almost every American home has one. Many of us happily use it daily, whether to warm up leftovers or boil a cup of water, without a second thought. But there are some health-conscious people out there who believe that microwave ovens are a health hazard, and/or that they destroy the nutrients in our food. Should we be concerned?

The short answer is no—with one caveat. According to Harvard Medical School, microwaves cook or heat food using waves of energy that are similar to radio waves. These waves primarily affect water molecules in the food, by causing them to vibrate and quickly build up heat as a result. There is no evidence that these types of waves harm our bodies in any way.

And microwaving our food is actually one of the best ways to preserve nutrients. When it comes to nutrient preservation, the faster the cooking method the better, and as we all know, the microwave tends to win the speed contest.

One thing we do need to be vigilant about is microwaving food in plastic. When many types of plastic are heated, either bisphenol-A (BPA) or phthalates can leach out of the plastic into the food—not a good situation. Both substances can mimic human hormones and are considered endocrine disruptors, which may produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, and immune effects in humans.

So as long as you’re careful about what containers you use to heat up your foods, you’re good to go!



The Health Benefits of Tea
February 28, 2017, 1:59 pm
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle | Tags:

We’re deep into winter, and you may either feel like you’re going stir crazy and can’t wait until those first warm days of spring, or perhaps you’re reveling in the idea of turning inward and “hibernating.” Either way, this is the perfect time of year to soothe your spirits with a hot cup of tea.

Not only can tea help warm you from the inside out, it can also calm stress, improve your mood, and curb your need for a snack or sugar. There are also many long-term health benefits of drinking tea. Based on numerous studies, thanks to substances called polyphenols green and black tea have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties. This translates into a reduction in the risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and liver disease. Bone health seems to improve with greater tea consumption as well.

As for herbal teas, many have been used for thousands of years to treat illnesses and ailments. Chamomile is good for settling the stomach and the nerves, and can help treat menstrual cramps. Echinacea has been used to boost immunity and to help ward off colds. Peppermint can improve digestion and help calm headaches. Dandelion is good for liver health and detoxification. This is just a sampling of teas and their benefits—there are so many other varieties you might like to explore as well.

So brew up a cup, relax, and sip slowly. The warm breezes and flowers of spring will be here before you know it.