Food Is Not Your Enemy


Is There Any “Life” in Your Work/Life Balance?

Are you working longer and harder than ever? Do you struggle to get enough sleep? To find time to cook? To relax? To look away from your phone for more than 20 minutes at a time, because important work emails may come in, even on a Sunday?

If you’re answering, “Yes, yes, yes, yes, and yes,” you may have also noticed that you’ve put on a few pounds over the past few years. Or that your anxiety levels have kicked up. Or that you’re always tired, no matter what. Or any other number of changes to your health.

Overwork and the deterioration of our health are closely related. Numerous studies have borne this out. And you likely know it on an intuitive level. But what can be done?

If your job is stressing you to the breaking point, you have two choices–find work you love or a way to love the work you have. If you dread going to work every day, and it’s been that way for a long time, think about whether this is really the job or career for you. Make a list of pros and cons about your job, and if the cons outweigh the pros, it may be time to either seek a similar job elsewhere, or think about what you really want to be doing with your life. Our time on this earth is short–do you really want to spend most of your time on it doing something that makes you unhappy?

If you’re not currently happy at your job but feel it truly isn’t possible to leave at the moment, then think about what steps you can take to improve your current situation. If your workload is killing you, speak with your supervisor and see what can be done to potentially lighten the load or get you support, and identify any time-wasters in your day and then eliminate them. Communication, planning, and smart time management can go a long way in helping you get through your day’s tasks. And it can really help to manage others’ expectations—if you’re routinely at work at 9 p.m., people will just come to expect that that’s what you do, and wouldn’t think twice about shooting you a work email at that hour. You may want to ask your boss—if he or she emails you over the weekend, are they hoping that you’ll deal with their request then and there? Some bosses don’t expect that—they just send the email over the weekend because they’re thinking about that particular issue and want to send the email while it’s fresh in their mind, expecting that you’ll get to it when back in the office on Monday.

With today’s seemingly endless work days, it’s more important than ever that we allow time for self-care, fun, and pleasure in our lives. If you have to schedule time for yourself into your calendar, then do it! Allow yourself time to browse your local greenmarket. Treat yourself to a massage. Sit at an outdoor café and linger over a cup of tea and the Sunday paper. Try out a new recipe you saw online. You get the idea. Whatever you choose, just know that these small steps to help you de-stress and care for yourself will make a big difference over time when it comes to your health—both mental and physical.

Advertisements


Five Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight
October 21, 2015, 9:56 am
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle, weight loss | Tags: , , , ,

Many people seek out my help because they find that they can’t lose weight, no matter what they try. They may tell me they’ve tried Atkins and Paleo, gone gluten-free for a year, done Weight Watchers, undertaken a juice fast, worked out three times a week with a trainer for two years, or all of the above. And nothing happened. Not a single pound was shed.

Why? How is it possible that all of these approaches can fail?

The answer can be different for everyone. Here are just a few of the reasons why your scale might refuse to budge:

Lack of sleep. Numerous studies have shown that lack of sleep leads to weight gain. If you’re regularly getting less than seven hours of sleep, expect to feel hungrier than you otherwise would, and know that you will likely find yourself taking in more calories than if you’d had a good night’s sleep.

Too much stress. As I mentioned in my May newsletter, (you can read it here), stress makes us fat. Stress activates a biological response that makes us feel hungry. And stress leads to increased storage of belly fat. If you change your diet for the better but stress hormones are constantly being pumped into your system by your adrenal glands, those excess pounds are not going anywhere.

Thyroid problems. Your thyroid gland regulates your metabolism. And if it’s not working properly, not only will you not lose weight, but you may find yourself suddenly and inexplicably gaining a lot of weight, even though your diet has remained the same. Get your thyroid checked if you see sudden changes in your weight and also experience such symptoms as brain fog, changes in your hair or skin, or debilitating fatigue.

Food sensitivities. If you have a hidden food intolerance–which is quite likely if you are bloated, gassy, constipated, or have diarrhea on a regular basis–then you won’t lose those extra pounds so easily. The offending food or foods is causing a constant state of inflammation in your body, and inflammation produces insulin resistance, leading to higher insulin levels. As insulin is a fat storage hormone, you’ll hold onto more fat, especially around your mid-section.

Restaurant food. Home cooking is increasingly becoming a rare occurrence for so many of us. The problem with this is that restaurant food and other foods prepared outside the home tend to have way more calories, fat, salt, and sugar than we think they do. Take a look at the “Calorie Bomb” section on the left side of my newsletter each month—do you find these calorie counts shocking? I do. The reason I put them there is to underscore how caloric food can be in many of America’s most popular restaurants. Think about this the next time you grab your file of takeout menus.



Relax to Lose Weight
June 2, 2015, 9:29 am
Filed under: Healthy Lifestyle, weight loss | Tags: , , , ,

New Yorkers work hard. We love to be busy and talk about how busy we are, and then we grouse about how stressed out we feel. If advice is offered to some of us type As about how to scale back and find a little time for ourselves, we will explain why we simply can’t do that, that it’s not possible to change anything, and that we just have to continue on and somehow survive on five hours of sleep and takeout Pad Thai.

And then we wonder why we can’t drop the 20 pounds we’ve put on in the past two years.

The fact is, stress makes us fat. And actively releasing that stress and relaxing can help us lose weight, in a way that all the steamed broccoli and skinless chicken breast in the world can’t.

Stress activates a biological response that makes us feel hungry (which is why so many of us stress eat). Carbs and sugar are particularly appealing when we’re stressed. And stress leads to increased storage of belly fat.

One of the easiest and most effective ways to counteract these forces conspiring to make us fat is to practice deep breathing. If you take a deep breath, you stimulate your vagus nerve, a nerve connected to your fat cells, stem cells and all the organs and tissues in your body. Stimulating this nerve turns on the production of hormones that calm your nervous system, reduce the stress hormone cortisol, kick start your metabolism, and regulate your appetite, according to Dr. Mark Hyman, a leader in the field of functional medicine. The simple act of taking deep breaths essentially leads to an increased level of fat burning.

So make some time on a regular basis to meditate, do yoga, or simply sit and breathe, without distraction. Even five minutes a day can make a difference. And who doesn’t have time for that?



5-Minute Stress Busters
June 23, 2014, 10:35 am
Filed under: Chronic Disease, Healthy Lifestyle | Tags: , ,

Stressed? Here are 16 simple ways to defuse your tension in a hurry—none of which requires a trip to the vending machine for chocolate …

Try a “one-minute meditation.” Close your eyes. For 30 seconds, inhale and exhale quickly, forcefully, and audibly. Each inhale/exhale cycle should last about 1 second total. After doing that for 30 seconds, for the next 30 seconds keep your eyes closed and breathe normally. Then open your eyes. How do you feel?

Sit on your hands or rub them together vigorously. Our hands get colder when we’re stressed, and warming them up helps lower stress.

Try acupressure. Find the spot on the top of your bare foot where the bones of your first and second toes meet. Gently press this area 10 times.

Say no. If you’re already feeling stressed, don’t be afraid to say no if someone asks you to do something you can’t handle.

Turn off the news. It’s easy to feel like part of the chaos we’re watching on TV or on the computer. Research has shown that watching the news can affect mood and aggravate sadness and depression.

Laugh. Laughing dissolves tension and can feel like a real release, even in the most stressful situations.

Put on some upbeat music. And if you’re in a place where you can get away with it, dance!

Smile at other people. Our moods are contagious–if you come across as happy and pleasant, chances are people will be pleasant back to you.

Have half a teaspoon of honey. Doing this will quickly help stimulate serotonin in the brain, leading to a calmer, happier feeling.

Realize that worrying doesn’t make things better. So stop worrying.

At the end of your day, take five minutes to write down the things you appreciated about that day. Calling up positive emotions will help push away negativity and stress.

Make a conscious choice not to become angry or upset. You may not be able to control everything happening around you, but you do have control over your response to any given situation. Take a few deep breaths. Then think about what can be done to resolve the situation, rather than focusing on how angry you are about it.

Do one simple thing that you’ve been putting off–whether it’s returning a phone call, paying a bill, or making a dentist appointment. Getting this thing off your mind will help you de-stress.

Vent to a friend for five minutes. Or write down your thoughts in a journal.

If you’re feeling anxious before bed and fear you won’t be able to get to sleep, have a cup of warm milk. It contains natural opiates called casomorphins.

Go outside.



Last Chance to Sign Up: Free Stress Reduction Teleclass on Monday, May 24 at 8 p.m. ET

Join me for my FREE stress reduction teleclass tonight, May 24 at 8 p.m. ET, when I’ll be sharing the basics of how to squash stress through food.

During the call, I’ll help you take the first step toward recognizing and calming the stresses in your life, which is critical for good health and weight maintenance.

There’s still time to register: simply click here and provide me with your full name, e-mail address, and phone number. I will then e-mail you the call-in information.



7 Surprising Things That Can Make You Gain Weight (and Most Aren’t Even Food!)

You eat veggies and whole grains. You hit the gym. You’ve got your portions under control. So what’s the deal with those last few stubborn pounds? Seven unexpected weight saboteurs could have something to do with it. Check out my first article on Glamour.com for more.



Save the Date for Free Stress-Reduction Teleclass

Save the date! On Monday, May 24 at 8 p.m. ET, I will be doing a free teleclass on how to reduce stress. I will be discussing the role stress plays in our lives and providing concrete steps on how to get stress under control. More details coming soon, but if you know you’d like to take part now, contact me here and I’ll send you the call-in info. Mark your calendar!